News

Prof. Mikhail Tikhonov says Microbiology Needs More Math ...

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What seems like luck is probably a lack of knowledge—and an incredibly exciting opportunity. The data generated by the booming field of microbiome research contains many hints that our familiar assumptions might in fact be wrong at the scale of microbial life. Microbiology might well be at the brink of revolutionizing how we think about living matter

Prof. James Buckley has received a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy in support of theoretical and experimental studies in particle physics and cosmology.

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Prof. Kenneth F. Kelton has received a grant from the NSF for a research project titled Fundamental Investigations of Nucleation Processes in Silicate Liquids and Glasses with a Goal of Developing Predictive Models for Glass Formation and Crystallization.

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Prof. Li Yang has received a grant from the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research for a research project titled Ferroelectricity, Multiferroics, and Enhanced Magnetoelectric Effect in Single-Atomic Layers.

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Prof. Christine Floss has received NASA support for a project titled Microanalytical Characterization of Presolar Silicate Grains: Constraints on Grain Formation in Stellar Environments and Grain Survival in the Early Solar Nebula.

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Wash U Researchers prepare to fly device over Antarctica to study space radiation ...

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Researchers at Washington University are using a 6,000-pound device called SuperTIGER. It converts cosmic rays into light and allows scientists to study the elements they contain. Bob Binns, a professor of physics who has been working on the SuperTIGER project since 1993, wants to test a theory about where cosmic rays come from.

Is nature fundamentally weird? Mark Alford explains ...

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Physicist Mark Alford first encountered this experiment, called the Bell test or the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen experiment, in the form of pages of equations and, taking pity on students everywhere, has found a way to describe it that more of us can understand. Here, he explains the logic behind a famous experiment designed to tell whether quantum mechanics is spooky or nonspooky.

2017 Newsletter

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New Faculty, Construction, X-Calibur and more!

Congratulations to Todd Hardt who has received an Outstanding Staff Award from the School of Arts and Sciences...

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Todd is an essential member of our department. Many of our faculty and many of our graduate students depend on him for achievement of their research goals

Professor Ken Kelton's group catch glass transition in the act ...

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One sign of the weirdness of glass is that the transition from liquid to a glass is much fuzzier than the transition from liquid to crystalline solid.

Professor Kater Murch is Shaking Schrodinger's Cat ...

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The quantum Zeno effect was named by analogy with the arrow paradox conceived by the Greek philosopher Zeno: At any given instant of time, an arrow in flight is motionless; how then can it move? Similarly, if an atom could be continually measured to see if it is still in its initial state, it would always be found to be in that state.

Congratulations to Ryan Wahidi this year's recipient of the Arts & Sciences Florence Moog Scholarship

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for more physics news

Check out our Annual Newsletter for more behind-the-scenes news about the department's people and activities.

Annual Newsletter