Back Results for: Faculty

Physics Research Group Heads to Antarctica to Launch Telescope

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It’s going to be a sunny, cold summer this December for scientists headed to Antarctica. McMurdo Station, the continent’s bustling metropolis of roughly 1,000 residents, will be home to researchers hoping to understand more about some of the most exotic phenomena in the universe – neutron stars and black holes.

Cold, Dark Stars Lurking in the Universe Could Act Like Single Giant Atoms

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Professor Bhupal Dev was recently interviewed and quoted in an article on LiveScience.

Professor James Buckley received a NASA grant

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James Buckley, a professor in the Department of Physics, received a three-year, $962,000 grant from NASA to support the development of a novel imaging calorimeter for gamma ray and cosmic ray studies.

Professor Kenneth Kelton Discusses Materials Through the Ages

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Over thousands of years, by trial and error, humankind has learned how to produce superior materials for different types of processing. Physicist Ken Kelton talks about materials through the ages.

Erik Henriksen received an NSF grant

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Erik Henriksen, assistant professor of physics, received a $406,000 National Science Foundation grant toward a project titled "Pursuit of quantum spin liquids in exfoliated anti-ferromagnetic insulators." Henriksen was also awarded $69,000 from Zyvex Labs to collaborate on the development of atomically precise fabrication and contactless measurement technology.

Improving Nuclear Detection with New Chip Power

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A cross-disciplinary team of chemists and physicists from Washington University in St. Louis is building a better computer chip to improve detection and surveillance for the illegal transport of nuclear materials at U.S. borders.

Demon in the Details of Quantum Thermodynamics

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Kater Murch, Associate Professor of Physics, and colleagues find quantum ‘Maxwell’s Demon’ may give up information to extract work

Article on Testing Einstein's Predictions

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Professor Krawczynski's article on testing Einstein's predictions for rotating black holes is an Editor's Choice for the August 2018 issue of General Relativity and Gravitation

X-Calibur Telescope Preparing for a Stratospheric Balloon Flight

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Professor Henric Krawczynski's group and an international team of scientists and engineers are preparing the X-Calibur telescope for a stratospheric balloon flight launched from McMurdo (Antarctic) in December 2018.

Washington People: Martin Israel

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Professor Martin Israel received the Dean’s Medal this spring. He discusses his background and career in this video profile from Arts & Sciences.

Alex Meshik Received a NASA Award

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Alex Meshik, research professor in physics in Arts & Sciences, received a $1.1 million award from NASA in support of a project titled “Analyses and interpretations of noble gases delivered by Genesis and Stardust missions – Phase 2.”

Flavor of the Moment

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New particle accelerators will probe how charged particles assume a new identity, or change ‘flavor,’ theorists say

Ryan Ogliore received a NASA grant

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Ryan Ogliore, assistant professor of physics in Arts & Sciences, received a $147,000 grant from NASA in support of a project titled “Investigating nearby supernovae through analyses of ancient and contemporary stardust.”

Professor James Miller discusses constructing a class from curiosity to course listings ...

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On the fifth Monday of each semester, a new source of productive procrastination becomes available: Course Listings go up on WebStac.

Congratulations to Professor Martin Israel the recipient of the 2018 Dean's Medal ...

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The Dean’s Medal honors a friend whose dedication and support have been exceptional and whose leadership, advice, and inspiration have served to place Arts & Sciences at the heart of one of the world’s premier universities.

Prof Li Yang has been selected into the name list of the world’s most impactful scientific researchers by Clarivate Analytics (Web of Science) ...

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"...your research ranks among the top 1% most cited works in your field and during its year of publication, earning the mark of exceptional impact. It is truly an honor to recognize researchers like you for your dedication and focus to expanding the sphere of human knowledge..."

Professor Erik Henriksen: New view on electron interactions in graphene ...

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Graphene has generated a lot of excitement in the materials-science research community because of its potential applications in batteries, solar energy cells, touch screens and more.

Brian Rauch has received continued support from NASA for particle astrophysics research with the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna.

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Professor Kater Murch has been selected as 2018 Cottrell Scholar ...

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He plans to work with other physics faculty to help them incorporate this approach. He also is broadening his use of flipped classrooms to include it in advanced-level classes and in the lab.

Professor Willem Dickhoff ... Reaching for Neutron Stars ...

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How they made their analysis and reached this predictive framework is part of their decade-long pursuit as well.

Professor Kater Murch and Rochester scientists discuss a bit of a quantum magic trick ...

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“It’s reminiscent of the magic tricks that involve a ball placed under one of two cups and the cups are shuffled around — except this time, the ball can be under both cups at the same time,

Prof. Mikhail Tikhonov says Microbiology Needs More Math ...

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What seems like luck is probably a lack of knowledge—and an incredibly exciting opportunity. The data generated by the booming field of microbiome research contains many hints that our familiar assumptions might in fact be wrong at the scale of microbial life. Microbiology might well be at the brink of revolutionizing how we think about living matter

Prof. James Buckley has received a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy in support of theoretical and experimental studies in particle physics and cosmology.

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Prof. Kenneth F. Kelton has received a grant from the NSF for a research project titled Fundamental Investigations of Nucleation Processes in Silicate Liquids and Glasses with a Goal of Developing Predictive Models for Glass Formation and Crystallization.

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Prof. Li Yang has received a grant from the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research for a research project titled Ferroelectricity, Multiferroics, and Enhanced Magnetoelectric Effect in Single-Atomic Layers.

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Prof. Christine Floss has received NASA support for a project titled Microanalytical Characterization of Presolar Silicate Grains: Constraints on Grain Formation in Stellar Environments and Grain Survival in the Early Solar Nebula.

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Wash U Researchers prepare to fly device over Antarctica to study space radiation ...

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Researchers at Washington University are using a 6,000-pound device called SuperTIGER. It converts cosmic rays into light and allows scientists to study the elements they contain. Bob Binns, a professor of physics who has been working on the SuperTIGER project since 1993, wants to test a theory about where cosmic rays come from.

Is nature fundamentally weird? Mark Alford explains ...

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Physicist Mark Alford first encountered this experiment, called the Bell test or the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen experiment, in the form of pages of equations and, taking pity on students everywhere, has found a way to describe it that more of us can understand. Here, he explains the logic behind a famous experiment designed to tell whether quantum mechanics is spooky or nonspooky.

Professor Ken Kelton's group catch glass transition in the act ...

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One sign of the weirdness of glass is that the transition from liquid to a glass is much fuzzier than the transition from liquid to crystalline solid.

Professor Kater Murch is Shaking Schrodinger's Cat ...

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The quantum Zeno effect was named by analogy with the arrow paradox conceived by the Greek philosopher Zeno: At any given instant of time, an arrow in flight is motionless; how then can it move? Similarly, if an atom could be continually measured to see if it is still in its initial state, it would always be found to be in that state.

Mark Alford and Mairin Hynes share why they became scientists ...

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Professor Carl Bender discusses how to find your one and only ...

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On the other hand, experimental psychologists who have studied the decision behavior of people in such situations as the fussy suitor problem have shown that people tend to stop searching too soon

Prof. Kater Murch receives the St. Louis Academy of Sciences 2017 Innovation Award ...

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Each year, the academy seeks nominations of outstanding women and men in science, engineering and technology who are known worldwide for their scientific contributions to research, industry and quality of life. Those recognized also have a record of excellence in communicating with the public or mentoring colleagues.

Professor Mark Alford discusses five extreme facts about neutron stars ...

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If a neutron star were any denser, it would collapse into a black hole and disappear, Alford says. “It’s the next to last stop on the line.”

Prof. Carl Bender wins the 2017 Dannie Heinemann Prize for Mathematical Physics ...

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How does Bender know which problem to pick, which problems might yield when pushed in this way? “You can smell it,” he said

Prof. Christine Floss has received NASA support for a project Characterizing Comet 81P/Wild 2 with Acfer 094 and Tagish Lake Analog Foils.

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Prof. Ryan Ogliore has received a grant from NASA for a field-emission scanning electron microscope that will be used to analyze samples of comets and asteroids.

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Congratulations to Prof. James G. Miller who was named the recipient of the 2016 Rayleigh Award at the International Ultrasonics Symposium held this year in Tours, France...

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Prof. James G. Miller was named the recipient of the 2016 Rayleigh Award at the International Ultrasonics Symposium held this year in Tours, France.

Congratulations to Prof. Willem Dickhoff who has received a grant from NSF for a project titled "Green’s Functions and the Nuclear Many-body Problem".

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Prof. Krawczynski’s team is preparing for the launch of the balloon borne X-Calibur experiment to study black holes and neutron stars. Follow the team via a blog with daily updates...

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Washington University Professors Krawczynski and Kislat are leading a campaign to launch the 8-m focal length X-ray telescope X-Calibur on a stratospheric balloon flight

Congratulations to Prof. Kater Murch on being awarded a NSF grant to investigate Measurement and Control in Open Quantum Systems ...

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This manner of detection turns everything upside down, he said. All that a photon detector can tell you about spontaneous emission is whether an atom is in its excited state or its ground state. But the interferometer catches the atom diffusing through a quantum “state space” made up of all the possible combinations, or superpositions, of its two energy states.