Back Results for: Staff

SuperTIGER and X-Calibur

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“SuperTIGER may launch any day now, and X-Calibur will be flight-ready right after them,” said Henric Krawczynski, professor of physics in Arts & Sciences. While they wait for launch from Antarctica, the team is eating well, skiing and seal watching. Follow their blog to see how the missions featuring WashU technology fare.

Physics Research Group Heads to Antarctica to Launch Telescope

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It’s going to be a sunny, cold summer this December for scientists headed to Antarctica. McMurdo Station, the continent’s bustling metropolis of roughly 1,000 residents, will be home to researchers hoping to understand more about some of the most exotic phenomena in the universe – neutron stars and black holes.

X-Calibur Telescope Preparing for a Stratospheric Balloon Flight

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Professor Henric Krawczynski's group and an international team of scientists and engineers are preparing the X-Calibur telescope for a stratospheric balloon flight launched from McMurdo (Antarctic) in December 2018.

Physics librarian Alison Verbeck receives the Graduate Student Senate’s Outstanding Staff Award for 2017-18...

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Physics librarian Alison Verbeck will be a recipient of the Graduate Student Senate’s Outstanding Staff Award for 2017-18

Dian Tan, a postdoctoral researcher working with Kater Murch, has received a fellowship from Rigetti Computing for a project titled "Mapping quantum states into and from noisy transmission lines with superconducting qubits."

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Congratulations to Todd Hardt who has received an Outstanding Staff Award from the School of Arts and Sciences...

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Todd is an essential member of our department. Many of our faculty and many of our graduate students depend on him for achievement of their research goals

Tyrone Daulton investigates the case of the missing diamonds ...

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For the second time in 10 years, Daulton has carefully reviewed the evidence, and found no evidence for a spike in nanodiamond concentration in Younger Dryas sediments. Because nanodiamonds are the strongest piece of evidence for the impact hypothesis, their absence effectively discredits it.